the word

November 20, 2010 | Posted by Admin in around los angeles,home-based business,uncategorized | Comments (4)

Part 1 of alternative places to write in L.A.

By Grant Stoner, Writer

Recently, like so many other Americans amidst our brand new Great Depression, I found myself without a cubicle in which to toil away in obscurity for the rest of my days. After sending out 7.2 million resumes without response, I was mired in self-pity, which is not the most productive place to be. I then decided to take control of my life, go back to school, and work on projects that I love. I could do it all from home, spend time with my kids, and maybe, just maybe find an awesome freelance writing job to help pay the bills. Frighteningly, and not without its struggles, things are kinda working out. Yay! I get to work from home!!! Well … like houseboats, backpacking across Europe, or camping, working from home sounds quite a bit cooler than it really is. Unless you’re fortunate enough to have an enclosed home office with all the amenities, you probably deal with the same frustrations as me. Yelling kids, rickety dining room chair, dishes piled up in the kitchen, and dust bunnies that need attending to right away.

So now what?

When you need to get out of the house, the typical alternative is your local Starbucks/Coffee Bean/Peet’s location. Not without their merits – free wi-fi, snacks, caffeine – a crowded, noisy coffee shop is not the most conducive to the creative process. There are also plenty of interesting, non-chain coffee shops in L.A., which you can check out on this nice Huffington Post piece highlighting the top 10 according to Deborah Shoeneman. My goal, however, was to find other resources that our fair city has to offer. My aim is to do a series of brief articles/reviews of alternative places for scribes to scribble outside of their living rooms.

First stop, The Office L.A.

I first heard about The Office L.A. through a friend, and shortly thereafter began following them on Twitter (you can too @theOffice_LA). Soon after, I received a message from them offering a free week to check out their space. Cha-ching… they had me hooked with free! It is a membership-based space, the details of which I’ll get into later. Once I finally decided to redeem the offer, I gave them a call and thus began my mission to find all the fantastic places to write in Los Angeles. The first stop couldn’t have been any better. My initial phone call was taken by Wade who gave me the lowdown, and warmly invited me to come down and try them out. It is located in the Brentwood neighborhood, directly across the street from The Brentwood Country Mart. Not the most convenient location in town, but an incredibly nice neighborhood with tons of restaurants and shops within walking distance. The Office has a few free parking spots in the back, but in my week of working there, I never found one open. No matter, there is plenty of metered parking as well as 2-hour free parking in the neighborhood behind the building. When I arrived the first time (you need to call ahead to make sure they have space for paying members), I was greeted again by Wade, who gave me a (quiet) tour of the facilities.

The Skinny.

First of all, the space is quite beautiful and tranquil, and as their website mentions, the “interior designed by Serena Walther Leventhal, with furniture and finishes designs by Tony Schubert and a good dose of Feng Shui by Master David Cho,” it all works to create a quiet and peaceful place to write. The key here is quiet. All the stations are open, facing the center of the room, so silence is key, and expected. Amenities are solid, including internet and wi-fi, complimentary coffee and tea, as well as a useful resource library with industry info and directories. There is also a community computer, and if you need to listen to music or watch video, they offer Bose headphones to check out. Bottom line, this is a great place to write when you need to get out of the house. You can spend your day here as long as you play the parking shuffle, and you can feel safe to leave your belongings to move the car or grab lunch. The cost is not chump change, $149 per month, but if you are pecking away at your local coffee house, you may be spending that much anyway. So check-em out, ask for Wade. Tell them Grant sent you!

The Office

Address:

256 26th Street, Suite 101

Santa Monica, CA

90402-2524

Phone:

310-917-4455

Next article I’ll cover the Santa Monica Public Library… yeah, you read that right.

Grant Stoner is a freelance writer and producer, currently finishing up his BA in Business and Social Entrepreneurship at Antioch University Los Angeles. You can follow him on Twitter @Grant_Stoner and connect with him on LinkedIn here.

 

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  • Interesting post. I am looking forward to your post about the Santa Monica library. Have you tried the BH library? Did you know that you can check out over 50 DVDs for two weeks from them?

    Kimberly on November 24, 2010, 4:42 pm

  • Thanks Kimberly! I’ve been to BH library a few times, but didn’t know about the DVD policy. How cool.

    Admin on November 24, 2010, 5:41 pm

  • This topic is fascinating and taps into the current trend toward coffee, computers and conversation. Could it work for others in different cities to explore their area as you have done and then link into you?

    Connie on December 10, 2010, 4:32 pm

  • That could be interesting, Connie. While most of our clientele are currently in Los Angeles, we are expanding our reach quite a bit. If you were to write something for your area and post it on a blog, we could certainly reference it in one of our next blogs, as we did with the Huffington Post article mentioned in this one.

    Admin on December 10, 2010, 5:38 pm

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October 27, 2010 | Posted by Admin in writing | Comments (0)

Whether your interest is screenwriting or nonfiction, making the decision to write takes passion, persistence, and patience.  But more than any of that,    you must do one critical thing.  You must actually sit down and write.  Jeanne Bowerman is a perfect example of someone who was dissatisfied with her career and had the drive and desire to make a change.  A self-taught writer, Jeanne is proof that you don’t always need degrees or extensive training to follow your dreams, just a lot of chutzpah!

TM:            How did you start writing?

JB:            I went to Cornell for hotel and restaurant management and I owned a motel and restaurant for 15 years, but I hated every minute of it.  After 15 years and after I had my kids, I said I can’t do this anymore. It’s just too much. I always wanted to write. I had taken a couple of creative writing classes in college, but I had a classic problem, which I’m pretty sure a lot of writers have, which is I’m extremely insecure.  I remember I was 40 thinking; I’m a stay at home mom with no kids at home because at that point my kids were in school, and what the hell am I doing? And somebody convinced me to do medical transcribing.  When I was doing the medical transcriptions I realized that I still had a brain and that I liked all those little things; the editing, the punctuation, the grammar, all of that.  It reawakened that desire in me to write, so I started to write a novel.  I immediately got sidetracked by one of my college friends into writing screenplays and I wrote a couple with her.  Then, I adapted the Pulitzer Prize winning book, “Slavery by Another Name,” with its author, Douglas A. Blackmon. We’ve been pitching it and having great meetings on it.  But now, I’m getting back to writing a novel. I’m finally going to write that novel. I’m craving writing alone. I’m craving being able to crawl inside the characters’ heads.

To read the entire article, go to www.examiner.com

 

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October 20, 2010 | Posted by Admin in examiner article,home-based business,writing | Comments (0)

Few careers lend themselves to working from home as well as writing. If you are a writer or even have an inkling (pun intended) for writing, then you might  consider working as a freelancer and setting up a home-based business. Of course, this applies to all kinds of writing: copy writing, articles, journalism, blogging, screenwriting, teleplays, poetry, fiction, and stage plays. The best part about working from home is deciding when, where and how you work–even if that means working in your underwear!

For the rest of this article, please go to www.examiner.com

 

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For writers it is common to work in a very isolated environment.  Many of us need peace and quiet to get our work done.  We usually have our own methods that work for each of us to undertake the task of putting word to paper (or monitor, as the case may be).  However, this can be problematic if you are trying to make a living as a writer.  Finding the balance between writing time and networking is critical for the success of a professional writer.

(For more, see the article at http://www.examiner.com/)

 

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With summer just around the corner, it’s time to search for summer interns. And what a better place put out our ‘help wanted’ sign than at the Santa Monica College internship fair?

Intern Jill and I spent a busy morning in sunny (and breezy!) Santa Monica chatting with students from a multitude of different majors and backgrounds. The response was amazing! In two hours I had ten times more interested candidates than in two months of searching online. I look forward to the daunting task of narrowing the list and picking our summer interns.

Thank you to Judy White, the SMC Internship Program Director, and the rest of the SMC team for putting together a wonderful event and making us feel welcome. Thank you to intern Jill for helping get everything ready. And thank you to all the students who stopped by The Write Approach table. We are excited to read your writing samples!

SMC Internship Fair

 

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March 3, 2010 | Posted by Taura in examiner article,general,non-profits | Comments (0)

According to GuideStar, there are over 17,000 non-profits in Los Angeles alone. Most of these organizations are in need of writing services for marketing purposes, campaigns, events, and any host of communication pieces. Working with a non-profit is a great way to build your portfolio while finding a sense of satisfaction in the work we do as writers.

Read the full article at examiner.com.

 

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January 13, 2010 | Posted by Taura in general,of interest | Comments (1)

Welcome to The Word, The Write Approach blog.  It’s been a long time coming, but it’s finally here.  There’s a lot going on over here and I can’t wait to see how it all unfolds.

Some things to expect from this blog are info on writing, being a freelancer, tidbits and information, tricks of the trade, resources for writers, tips and tools for writers, information for clients, opportunities for writers and clients such as grant RFPs and other goodies!  I plan to also add some guest bloggers as well!

In addition to the nitty gritty of the writing of business, I will also be writing about my so-called crazy life!  With a wedding in the mix there’s sure to be a post or two about that.  I may bring you along on the wedding planning express.  I will also be blogging about things I love or think are worthy of sharing.

So, check in often, follow The Write Approach on Facebook and Twitter (links to the right), and don’t forget to subscribe to my articles on Examiner.com.  If I have worked with you, please be sure to add your testimonial to the site.  Your feedback is so very important!

Your support is very much appreciated!

 

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  • I look forward to reading more on The Word! All the best!

    Lynn

    Lynn Stevenson on January 13, 2010, 11:35 am

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